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Ozarks Medical Center Provides Free Crisis Counseling to Flood Victims

Ozarks Medical Center Provides Free Crisis Counseling to Flood Victims

Ozarks Medical Center (OMC) has a help line and 24-hour crisis hotline for flood victims who are experiencing anxiety, loss of sleep, excessive worry, mood swings, anger, or any unusual behavior. The help line and hotline services are intended to restore hope to individuals affected by the flood and to empower disaster survivors as they rebuild their lives. Calls are completely confidential. Crisis counselors will not collect any identifying information.

The hotline and helpline services are provided by a grant from the Show Me Hope Crisis Counseling Program (CCP), which is funding crisis counseling to counties affected by this year’s historic floods. This grant, awarded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to the Department of Mental Health (DMH), will provide outreach to OMC’s service area and five other Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) throughout Missouri.

OMC’s service area is Texas, Howell, Shannon, Oregon, Douglas, Ozark, and Wright counties. Flood victims living outside of this service area also have free mental health services in their area and can be connected with their local mental health resources by calling the 24-hour Disaster Distress Helpline at 800-985-5990 or by texting the message “TalkWithUs” to 66746.

Individuals living in OMC’s seven-county area may receive free counseling by calling the West Plains help line at 417-257-6762 (toll-free at 800-492-9439) or Mountain Grove’s help line at 417-926-6563 (toll-free at 888-635-4679). OMC’s 24-Hour Crisis Hotline is 800-356-5395.

OZARKS MEDICAL CENTER starts a flood survivor help line and hotline. Staff members from left, Community Supports Specialists Erik Carlson, Amanda Huskey, and Dana Fleming Jennifer Miller, Financial Analyst; and Curtis Cook, Clinical Manager.

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